Wild River Review
Wild River Review
Connecting People, Places, and Ideas: Story by Story
May 2010
Open Borders
 

October 20, 2012

Wild Table Guest Post: Deanna Morauski

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: , , — warren @ 12:59 pm

Photo: Courtesy of Deanna Morauski

This is a Wild Table guest post from my friend Deanna Morauski who will be featured on the Live Well Network this month.

(see show details below).

livewellnetwork.com

The Live Well Network offers a wide range of entertainment-based programs, including home decorating, fashion and beauty, food, health, outdoor adventures, travel and finance.

*****

Who can possibly get enough lovely, holiday bread recipes? This comforting yet refreshing fancy orange bread recipe is one of the loveliest in all of the bread kingdom. She is a gorgeous gift and a stunning addition to any holiday spread. One can only hope for leftovers which can be stored in the freezer and reheated with a little butter so the joy of the holidays can be experienced again and again.

Grandma Leonia’s Orange Bread

Ingredients:

3 cups flour
1 cup sugar
1 cup nonfat milk
2 eggs
4 teaspoons baking powder
1 teaspoon salt
1 cup sugar
2 medium sized oranges – peel only

To prepare orange peel:

Take the peeling from 2 medium sized oranges and cut into small pieces, add water and boil 20 min.

Drain and add more water and boil again for 20 minutes.

Drain, add 1 C sugar and only a little water and boil another 20 minutes.

Store candied orange peel in refrigerator, covered.

To make bread:

Combine flour, 1 C sugar, milk, eggs, baking powder, salt and candied orange peel.

Let stand in prepared bread pan for 20 minutes (floured).

Bake at 350F for 45 minutes.

Makes 2 loaves.

About Deanna Morauski:

You can see Deanna on Joey Fatone’s new show “My Family Recipe Rocks” on the Live Well Network ( http://livewellnetwork.com/ ) this month on October 27th. She will be making four scrumptious recipes throughout an entire episode filmed at her B&B, The Old Hen. The episode was deemed “One of the best episodes of the season” by the show’s producers. Follow along on with Deanna on her Facebook page facebook.com/theoldhen or on Twitter twitter.com/theoldhen for updates .

Deanna’s love for baking and cooking began as she sat upon a baker’s stool as a little girl. Her love for people grew in the midst of church potlucks. She expresses her loves today creatively through speaking, writing for her foodie blog, television appearances as well as hosting guests, including celebrities, at her inn, The Old Hen Bed & Breakfast in Snoqualmie Valley, Washington.

To support our mission and passion for good storytelling, please help support my work and make a tax-deductible donation by clicking here:  Wild River Donation.

Wild River Review/Wild Table editor, Warren Bobrow grew up on a Biodynamic farm in Morristown, NJ. A graduate of Emerson College in Boston- with a degree in Film, he spent his senior year of college as a research assistant in visual thinking. (Center for Advanced Visual Studies @ MIT)

To learn more about Warren, click here:  Wild River Review.

Please follow me on Twitter @WarrenBobrow1

Blue Hill/Stone Barns: Time Exists in Harmony with Nature

WILD TABLE – Billy Reid: Bourbon, Branch and a Splash of Southern Lore

Who owns the rights to work published in Wild River Review?

All work published in the pages of Wild River Review belongs to the magazine.

For print publication, please contact: info@wildriverreview.com

We welcome online links, but you must be fully credited with a link back to the Wild River Review website.

Warren is a cocktail creator/author/contributor to Williams-Sonoma and also for Foodista.

August 7, 2012

Ted Breaux- A Modern Day Absinthe-Alchemist

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: , , , , — warren @ 4:08 pm

F1_Engine

WRR: Where did you grow up? Have you always had a taste for adventure? When did you catch the Absinthe bug?

Ted: I was born in New Orleans and lived there as a child, until we relocated to Lafayette (LA), in the heart of Cajun country. It was a small, but surprisingly cosmopolitan city. I really enjoyed living there.

I’ve always had a taste for adventure, especially if dome degree of scientific and engineering innovation were involved in pulling off an entertaining stunt. I became interested in absinthe toward the end of 1993.

It was liquor. It was more of a chemistry issue for Ted. Working as a chemist almost 20 years ago. Incredulous …

I was studying absinthe distilled absinthe on a research basis. Back in 1996 I found 2 bottles and took apart the chemical properties of the Absinthe. These were extremely rare, Pre-Ban bottles.

They exemplified flavor over theatrics.

I think Absinthe should come with an owners manual.

Telefunken_Diamond_ECC83

WRR: Do you cook, you live in France and you’re surrounded by marvelous ingredients? If so, who taught you? Mother, Father? Grandparents? Cookbooks? Television?

Ted: Officially, I live in Birmingham, AL since floating out of New Orleans on the floodwaters of Hurricane Katrina.  I just spend quite a lot of time overseas.

I do cook, although my cooking tends to be nutrient dense, healthy dishes that just come out of my imagination.  In that sense, I’m mostly self-taught.

My grandmother’s were responsible for the cooking that I remember the most.  We ate well, Indian Foods, Ethiopian Food, etc.

I’m very familiar with Cajun cooking from growing up in Cajun Country.   I like to cook very healthy dishes. Whole ingredients.  I had a great adolescence.

It was very satisfying to grow up here.

There is a specific European, Latin mindset here in New Orleans.  With that said, New Orleans by design is very different from regions not far away.

I am very family oriented .. Lots of cultural exposure from my family.

Field of Wormwood


WRR:  If you could be anywhere in the world where would that be? What would you eat/drink once you got there?

Ted: If I could snap my fingers and be anywhere, I could see myself relaxing in Cusco while sipping coca tea, or maybe somewhere in the depths of the Indian subcontinent with a plate of methi gosht.

WRR: Is there anything that you’ve imbibed that brings a tear to your eye? What is it? Why?

Ted: A generous friend and I recently cracked open a 1900 Tokaji Aszú Eszencia which we drank from some of Czar Nicholas II’s personal glassware. That was a most memorable experience. Aside from that, a spectacular calvados from 1850, a couple of vintage absinthes, and just about any 100% folle blanche Bas Armagnac from Domaine Boingnères. In each case, when the romance is brushed aside, the product truly speaks volumes of the artistry behind its making.

PPG_Wave

WRR:  Speaking of Eating and drinking, what is your favorite cocktail? Made by whom? Where?

Ted: I tend to identify themes that I feel individual bartenders do to my liking and task them to expound upon it. They don’t necessarily realize what I’m doing. But if there is one pattern I repeat with consistency when it comes to bartenders and cocktails, it’s when I walk through the doors of Zig Zag Café (Seattle) and upon seeing Kacy Fitch, I always demand (loudly) if anyone in “this jukejoint” knows how to make a Ramos Gin Fizz.

Fortunately, someone does.

Renaud Pot Stills

Thank you Ted for braving the humidity and heat to talk to me.

To support our mission and passion for good storytelling, please help support my work and make a tax-deductible donation by clicking here:  Wild River Donation.

Wild River Review/Wild Table editor, Warren Bobrow grew up on a Biodynamic farm in Morristown, NJ. A graduate of Emerson College in Boston- with a degree in Film, he spent his senior year of college as a research assistant in visual thinking. (Center for Advanced Visual Studies @ MIT)

To learn more about Warren, click here:  Wild River Review.

Please follow me on Twitter @WarrenBobrow1

Blue Hill/Stone Barns: Time Exists in Harmony with Nature

WILD TABLE – Billy Reid: Bourbon, Branch and a Splash of Southern Lore

Who owns the rights to work published in Wild River Review?

All work published in the pages of Wild River Review belongs to the magazine.

For print publication, please contact: info@wildriverreview.com

We welcome online links, but you must be fully credited with a link back to the Wild River Review website.

Warren is a cocktail creator/author/contributor to Williams-Sonoma and also for Foodista.

Chef Justice: Courtesy of Laura Martin Bacon

A Neighborhood Chef Cooks Up Dreams

by Laura Martin Bacon/  Special to Wild Table


Justice Stewart is a real neighborhood guy. On weekdays, he works at his construction job in Brooklyn. On weekends (and during every other minute of free time), he’s a creative cook, avid fisherman, fanatical food blogger – and executive producer of an online TV show called Neighborhood Chefs.

“Basically, I’m an everyday guy with a passion for cooking,” Justice tells me. “Let’s face it, we all love food. Humans are the only species on earth that prepares and serves food in a ton of different ways. Food is like art and music – it’s a universal language that lets us all share and express ourselves in a uniquely meaningful way.”

Justice says that he wasn’t always out there advocating for great food. “After my dad died, I was a young kid without a guiding hand to help steer me in the right direction. I wound up making a few bad choices that resulted in some not-so-good results, including a couple of scrapes with the law. Yet, even during those difficult times, I found that food and the love of cooking were a part of me.”

As a kid, Justice spent a lot of time watching his mom, aunt and grandmother cook – and those memories stayed with him. “I took a job in the construction industry and willed myself off the streets. I started cooking gourmet meals at home – and realized how happy it made me.”

He became fascinated with making the most of local, seasonal ingredients – including his own fresh-caught fish. “I also like to weave stories and cultures into my recipes,” he says. “Most of my construction coworkers are from Central and South America – and they’ve inspired me to experiment with Latin recipes.

“Another great source of inspiration is wandering around cookware and specialty food stores. My spiced shrimp recipe was the creative result of a trip to Williams-Sonoma – their spice combos and cocktail mixes put me in the mood for something summery with a tropical island feel. And since I love  seafood, shrimp was the perfect way to showcase all those fresh, healthy, warm-weather flavors.”

These days, Justice is doing everything he can to spread the word that healthy, great-tasting food can make a huge difference in the lives of both kids and adults. He shares his love for cooking in his blog, Gourmet Deconstructed, and on the Neighborhood Chefs show.

“It’s all about highlighting the average person who can really get busy in the kitchen, that jewel of a cook who may live right next door to you – and you had no idea. For our show, we look for hidden gems in our backyard and give them an opportunity to shine.”

Justice is also planning on going back to his old neighborhood and working with kids to help them make better life choices – and show how healthy eating can help lead to longer, happier lives.

“I want to show kids that just because you’re surrounded by bad things in life does not mean that you have to stay with them. You have a choice. You can make your world and your life a much kinder, more wonderful place by believing in yourself and following your dreams.”

For Justice, many of those dreams began in the kitchen – and he’s planning to cook up a lot more of them. Stay tuned!

Justice Stewart’s Spiced Shrimp with Mango, Rum and Cashews

“Seafood and summer go hand in hand for me, since I’m an avid fisherman during the warmer months. I grew up fishing every weekend with my mom, dad, grandmother, aunts and uncles. It was a family thing we loved to do together. Today, I love using fresh seafood in my recipes – this spicy shrimp dish is one of my all-time favorites for summer entertaining!”

Ingredients:

1/2 teaspoon  brown sugar

1 1/2 teaspoon black pepper

1/4 teaspoon cayenne

1/4 cup olive oil

1/2 cup salted cashews

1 1/2 pound large or jumbo shrimp

1 teaspoon kosher salt

1/4 cup finely chopped scallions

3 garlic cloves, finely chopped

2 tablespoons of Bacardi gold, or any dark rum (Bacardi Gold gives the dish hints of vanilla)

1 large (15-ounce) mango, cut into 1/4-inch cubes (or use 2 small mangoes)

1 1/2 teaspoons cider vinegar

1/2 cup chopped fresh cilantro leaves

Directions:

1. In a small bowl, stir together the brown sugar, 1/2 teaspoon black pepper and cayenne. Heat 1 tablespoon oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add the cashews and sugar-spice mixture to the skillet; cook, stirring, until nuts are golden, 2 to 3 minutes. Scrape nuts into a bowl.

2. Wipe out skillet. Season shrimp all over with salt and remaining 1 teaspoon pepper. Return skillet to medium-high heat and add the remaining 3 tablespoons oil. Add scallions and half of the cilantro; cook, stirring, for 1 minute. Add garlic and shrimp.

3. Cook, stirring occasionally, until shrimp is done and cooked through, about 6-8 minutes. Pour in the rum and cook, scraping up any browned bits from the bottom of the pan, until the rum evaporates, about 1 minute.

4. Remove pan from heat and add nuts, mango, vinegar and other half of the cilantro leaves. Taste and adjust seasonings, if necessary. For the ultimate summer feel, serve your shrimp with island-style cocktails.

To support our mission and passion for good storytelling, please help support my work and make a tax-deductible donation by clicking here:  Wild River Donation.

Wild River Review/Wild Table editor, Warren Bobrow grew up on a Biodynamic farm in Morristown, NJ. A graduate of Emerson College in Boston- with a degree in Film, he spent his senior year of college as a research assistant in visual thinking. (Center for Advanced Visual Studies @ MIT)

To learn more about Warren, click here:  Wild River Review.

Please follow me on Twitter @WarrenBobrow1

Blue Hill/Stone Barns: Time Exists in Harmony with Nature

WILD TABLE – Billy Reid: Bourbon, Branch and a Splash of Southern Lore

Who owns the rights to work published in Wild River Review?

All work published in the pages of Wild River Review belongs to the magazine.

For print publication, please contact: info@wildriverreview.com

We welcome online links, but you must be fully credited with a link back to the Wild River Review website.

Warren is a cocktail creator/author/contributor to Williams-Sonoma and also for Foodista.

June 6, 2012

Jack From Brooklyn.. A surprise meeting at the Manhattan Cocktail Classic

Filed under: Uncategorized — warren @ 10:18 am

photo courtesy of: Michael Munoz

I met Jack at the Manhattan Cocktail Classic last month in NYC.  He’s a gregarious guy, friendly and soft-spoken.

My friend Emily Cavalier wanted me to taste the new vibrant liqueur named Sorel- and meet the man behind the brand, Jack Summers.

I agreed because I like Emily and respect her sophisticated palate.  Plus, Sorel is a gorgeous new product that deserves your attention!

Photo: David Schumacher

But what exactly is Sorel?

Sorel hails from the Caribbean.  It is, from the their graphically extremely attractive website, Jack from Brooklyn:

The brightness of Brazilian clove. The warmth of Indonesian cassia. The heat of Nigerian ginger. The woody bottom of Indonesian nutmeg. The full, aromatic body of Moroccan hibiscus. Pure cane sugar.  The finest 100% organic NY grain alcohol.

Photo: Adam Klimaszewski

WRR: 1. Where are you from?  And now?  What did you want to be when you grew up?

I’m a native New Yorker; born and bred. Birthed in Queens, schooled in Manhattan, living in Brooklyn since my divorce in ‘97. If you cut me, I’d bleed asphalt. I studied illustration at the High School of Art & Design, and dreamed of being a sculptor. I started working as an art director two months after graduation, and enjoyed a quarter-century career that spanned the words of finance, advertising, and publishing.

Photo: Adam Klimaszewski

WRR: 2.  Do you cook?  What is your favorite food?  IF you cook, who taught you?  Mother? Father? Grandparents?

I was pretty much raised in the kitchen, on my mother’s apron strings. My dad was infamous for his inability to as much as boil water, which made my mom that much more determined that all of her boys should know how to cook. My job as a child was to be the official taster. Mom would fix a meal, and in the process, ask me: what does this need? In this manner I became acquainted with the nature of spices; their fragrances, their potency, how one spice could balance, compliment, or overpower another. This is where my love of cooking and my mastery of spices was born.

Photo: Adam Klimaszewski


WRR: 3.  Is there anything that brings a tear to your eye when you taste/drink it?  Why?  Or cook?  A favorite recipe?  Care to share?

I will admit with no shame: I make the best burgers in Brooklyn. They have come to be known affectionately as “Jack’s Famous Fireburgers” owing to the single Habanero pepper finely diced into every five pounds of meat. I love potent spices but preach respect for them: you should always feel the heat, but never taste the burn.

Photo: Adam Klimaszewski


WRR:  4.  If you could be anywhere in the world right now where would that be?  Doing what?  With whom?

In the spring of 2010, I was diagnosed with a spinal tumor. My doctor said there was a 95% chance it was something called an Ependymoma. A quick google search told me this was bad: a malignant tumor in your lymphatic system is essentially a death sentence. I put my affairs in order. I submitted to neurosurgery, to discover in the recovery room the tumor was actually a schwannoma: benign. Having dodged that bullet, I found returning to my day job as Director of Stuff and Things at Hoity Fashion magazine was now untenable. I only wanted to do things that mattered to me with people i cared about.  So when longtime friend Alan Camlet introduced me to Tim Kealey, with a view to making my (famous among friends) recipe for sorrel into a market-ready product, I leaped at the chance. The company–like our first product, Sorel–was born in my kitchen. I can’t imagine anything or anywhere being better than where I am, right here, right now.

Photo Courtesy of Jack Summers


WRR:  5.  You use Social Media, how do you anticipate it will help you in your business?

As a new brand with limited marketing budget, social media has been the grand equalizer. It allows us to compete for national and international attention with the big boys. It helps to build stronger connections with our audience, and has generated tremendous press for us. In all fairness, we have retained the services of social media strategist extraordinaire Lori Edelman of Second Self Media. Any success we’ve enjoyed on the interwebs is directly attributable to her guidance.

http://www.liquortarian.com/

https://twitter.com/#!/theliquortarian

https://www.facebook.com/TheLiquortarian

http://jackfrombrooklyn.com/about/blog/

Thank you Jack for your kindness.  I anticipate great things from you in the very near future!

Cheers to you my friend!  wb

***********************

To support our mission and passion for good storytelling, please help support my work and make a tax-deductible donation by clicking here:  Wild River Donation.

Wild River Review/Wild Table editor, Warren Bobrow grew up on a Biodynamic farm in Morristown, NJ. A graduate of Emerson College in Boston- with a degree in Film, he spent his senior year of college as a research assistant in visual thinking. (Center for Advanced Visual Studies @ MIT)

To learn more about Warren, click here:  Wild River Review.

Please follow me on Twitter @WarrenBobrow1

Blue Hill/Stone Barns: Time Exists in Harmony with Nature

WILD TABLE – Billy Reid: Bourbon, Branch and a Splash of Southern Lore

Who owns the rights to work published in Wild River Review?

All work published in the pages of Wild River Review belongs to the magazine.

For print publication, please contact: info@wildriverreview.com

We welcome online links, but you must be fully credited with a link back to the Wild River Review website.

Warren is a cocktail creator/author/contributor to Williams-Sonoma and also for Foodista.

May 21, 2012

Shane Inman of the Inman Company- The Five Questions

I first met Shane during the recent Brimfield Antiques Fair.  Located a few miles from historic Sturbridge, Massachusetts, Brimfield is the largest outdoor antiques fair in the world.  Teeming with all sorts of ephemera, from kitsch to high fashion, the Brimfield show is a have to attend event of the year.

This year I was invited by Cynthia Bogart (The Daily Basics) and Gretchen Aubuchon (Gretchen Aubuchon Design) to be their mixologist.

It was here in the VIP tent that I became at first acquainted with- then friends with Shane.

Shane is an intense man of the very highest standards.  His sense of light, space and color showed clearly in his floral arrangements and furniture placement within the 80 x 20 foot tent.

The tent was used by a multitude of sponsors to take in a cocktail (prepared free-style by myself) to the correction of the morning coffee.  They also had the opportunity to charge their cell-phones or relax in the shade.

Here is a list of the generous sponsors to the Brimfield event.  List courtesy of THE DAILY BASICS.

Benjamin Moore announced their new metal paints and chalkboard colors!

Company C Fabrics gave a sneak peek into the their 2013 line and Spring color predictions!

Kathryn Markel’s,  Debra Marcoux brought her amazing line of emerging modern artists’ work to the tent with a raffle to win a piece of original art.

Warren Bobrow highlighted our drinks sponsors:  Tenneyson Absinthe, Polar Seltzers, Bitter End Bitter, Rose Syrup NY.

Shane Inman designed, implemented and created the most WONDERFUL ambiance of a tent.

Style at Home Magazine’s White Cover next month will be picked by the voters from the #Brimfield Tweetup.

Saturday at Brimfield Sponsor, Robert Allen Design, announced their GORGEOUS new line of fabrics.

I asked Shane during dinner the first night if he would be interested in participating in my project known as the Five Questions.

His face lit up immediately.  “Me?” “yes, Shane, you.  You would be perfect for this project…”

And so, without further delay, may I present Shane Inman.

The Five Questions. 

Cheers to you my friend.  wb

Shane Inman (NYC)

WRR: 1.  Why Design?  When did you first catch the design bug?  Who taught you?  Mother? Father? Grandparents?

Shane: As a child I drew illustrations of people from fashion magazines, and built homes out of Legos. My father thought I would become an architect while my mother taught me to sew. When I graduated high school, I had to go to a lower level college until I raised my GPA in order to be accepted into my father’s alma mater, Michigan State University. I allowed myself until my second year in college to decide if I was going to be a fashion designer or an interior designer. At the time of my acceptance to MSU, they had one of the most reputable design schools in the nation and the fit seemed perfect. In 1993 I don’t believe the world really understood interior design, myself included. The ones that did probably thought of it as being a luxury strictly for the rich and famous. Today I am out to modify that perception

Shane at the Waterfall

WRR: 2.  If you could be anywhere in the world, where would that be?  What would you be doing?  Eating? Drinking?

Shane: Anywhere in the world – that is a very big question! I would have to answer, right where I am! I believe that everything happens for a reason in this world and honestly I know the universe has led me to Chicago to do something really grand and great. I just do not know what yet. Since I love interior design, I can’t imagine doing anything else. A typical day finds me working away at my desk drinking coffee in the morning and sipping sparkling water with lemon throughout the afternoon. I always try to snack on nuts and berries rather than having a large lunch. It also saves valuable time during the work day of obligations and racing against the clock. To tell you the truth, I would much rather be working than eating (my client’s tell me that I have issues).

Liberty

WRR: 3. Speaking of Eating and drinking, what is your favorite cocktail?  Made by whom?  Do you cook?  What is your go/to dish?  Where?

Shane: My favorite cocktail has always been a very dirty (filthy dirty) vodka martini – up in a rocks glass versus a martin glass. I never have been one that feels comfortable drinking out of dainty stemware – I spill a lot. My vodka of choice is Kettle One – I was tuned on to it by a client of mine, a real sophisticated alcoholic. When it comes to cooking – quite honestly, I rarely do it. I am a work-aholic and as you can guess, that isn’t very indicative of having a lot of time to prepare meals. I eat out a lot! But on occasion, when I do prepare a meal – it is usually something fast that requires minimal effort on my part. I tend prepare more meats and fishes – things that can be ready in a flash. I love asparagus as well and almost always have that as my veggie.

Ground Zero

WRR: 4.  Is there anything that you eat that brings a tear to your eye when you enjoy it?  Why?  Is there anything that you make yourself that resonates in the same way?

Shane: Carrot cake has been one of my all-time favorites but since I treat my body as a temple, I don’t allow myself to have it very much anymore in my adult life. In my youth, I used to eat it whenever it was available. I consider myself a connoisseur of carrot cake. It has to have walnuts and the cream cheese frosting has to be just like my mothers – very creamy without the granulated feel of sugar. My mother was a great cook at several restaurants that my parents owned when I was a child. My mother used to make the best carrot cake with the ultimate in cream cheese frosting – every bite I have ever had around the world has been compared to hers. For me, I am not a baker and have never made a desert in my life. Being as detail oriented as I am, I would have to guess that I would be pretty good at it though….

Ocean from afar

WRR: 5.  Where did you grow up?  What did you want to be when you grew up?

Shane: I grew up with very humbled beginnings in the Mid-West. A small “village” called Lake City in Michigan. I always thought that I would be a fashion designer when I grew up since having six sisters – that just seamed like a natural career path. But viola – I am now an interior designer. A very close second if you ask me.

Thank you for your time Shane! Cheers!

To support our mission and passion for good storytelling, please help support my work and make a tax-deductible donation by clicking here:  Wild River Donation.

Wild River Review/Wild Table editor, Warren Bobrow grew up on a Biodynamic farm in Morristown, NJ. A graduate of Emerson College in Boston- with a degree in Film, he spent his senior year of college as a research assistant in visual thinking. (Center for Advanced Visual Studies @ MIT)

To learn more about Warren, click here:  Wild River Review.

Please follow me on Twitter @WarrenBobrow1

Blue Hill/Stone Barns: Time Exists in Harmony with Nature

WILD TABLE – Billy Reid: Bourbon, Branch and a Splash of Southern Lore

Who owns the rights to work published in Wild River Review?

All work published in the pages of Wild River Review belongs to the magazine.

For print publication, please contact: info@wildriverreview.com

We welcome online links, but you must be fully credited with a link back to the Wild River Review website.

Warren is a cocktail creator/author/contributor to Williams-Sonoma and also for Foodista.

April 27, 2012

Cocktail Hour! A visiting bartender series (NEW to Wild Table)

I’ve surrounded myself with many talented mixologists and bartenders over the past year.  In keeping with the desire of Wild Table to unlock the secrets behind the bar, I’ve decided to take a different path.

This article is written by a most interesting man.  During our email conversations I discovered that this gentleman has lived a very exciting life!

It’s revealing to find out from bartenders, what things influence them- and let them have a forum for their thoughts.

Humberto Marques is one of these tireless denizens of the bar.  He speaks carefully and I hope my editing of his writing gives you a sense of balance in his recipes.  I did not translate the European measurements in keeping with my desire for authenticity.

If you need to translate shots into cl, may I please suggest writing him!  I’m sure you would have a fine conversation.  Humberto Marques <berto-sm@hotmail.com>

Please feel free to leave a comment at the bottom should you desire.  It’s always nice to hear the thoughts of my readers.

I’d like to frame this piece with a quote from Humberto’s LinkedIn page:

Humberto Marques:  Is capable of turning a mix of ingredients into magic elixirs ~Cocktails

Where Cocktail Creativity and Originality Meet Together

By: Humberto Marques (Edited by Warren Bobrow)

Unfaithful

Cocktail recipe – Unfaithful

Ingredients:

5cl Hendricks gin

4slices of cucumber

1cl Cointreau

3cl fresh squeezed lemon juice

2cl Acacia honey

1 bar spoon of raw licorice powder

Methodology:

Muddle, shaken and fine strain into a vintage martini glass

Garnish: licorice root

Background & Comments: The idea of putting this cocktail together came from research on the effects of Licorice And Cucumber:

Every guy over time has wished for a miracle musk; a magical cologne that can ensnare the woman of his dreams.  No such secret formula exists, of course, but the right scents can put a woman in the mood.

I create a cocktail based on this idea.

In the late ‘90s, Alan Hirsch, MD, of the Smell and Taste Treatment and Research Foundation in Chicago, set out to discover which scents really push people’s buttons.  He exposed subjects to several scents and measured their sexual arousal by monitoring the blood vessels in and around the erotic zones of the human body. The results? A licorice and cucumber concoction was the most effective in triggering a response in both women and men.

(Editor’s Note, I’m running down to get a couple of cucumbers right now. I already have Absinthe)

It’s an odd combination of aromas, but Hirsch found that they boosted sexual appetite in women more than any other smell. The explanation? “Odors are intricately associated with sexual arousal,” Hirsch says. Licorice and cucumber don’t seem sexy, but Hirsch theorizes that their smells may make women comfortable and lower their anxiety levels.

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Cocktail recipe:

Mimosa Daiquiri

Mimosa

Ingredients:

6cl Angostura 1919 Rum

3cl Fresh squeezed lime-juice

3 cl Mimosa Syrup (home-made) or sourced from French Artisans.

Method: Shake all the ingredients over ice and strain into a martini glass

Garnish: Mimosa Flower

Comments: One of the best twists on the cocktail named a Daiquiri that I have ever tasted…

The Mimosa is known as the Silver Wattle tree (species name: Acacia Dealbata) is native to the southeastern Australian states of New South Wales, Victoria and Tasmania. They are also located in the south of Europe around the Mediterranean.

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Victorian Era

During the summer heat, Victorian women placed lemon verbena leaves in their handkerchiefs to inhale and refresh themselves, according to Possum Creek Herb Farm. They also used the leaves to scent the water in fingerbowls during elaborate, multi-course Victorian dinners. Lemon Verbena is mentioned as Scarlet O’Hara’s mother’s (Ellen Robillard O’Hara) in the movie “Gone with the Wind”-1939 as her favorite plant.

Cocktail recipe:

“Gone with the Wind”

Gone with the Wind

6cl of Beefeater gin

3cl apricot puree

3 large Lemon Verbena leaf springs

3 lemon slices

(1 cl fresh squeezed lemon juice total)

2cl Acacia honey

Method: shake all the ingredients over ice and double strain into a Martini glass

Garnish : Lemon Verbena sprig

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Cocktail recipe: Lady Eucalyptus

(Previously know as Eucalyptus martini in “The Gin Compendium book by Gary Regan)

Lady Eucalyptus

Ingredients:

50 ml Tanqueray gin

30 ml Homemade Eucalyptus Syrup*

30 ml lime-juice

20ml Cointreau

1 dash egg white

Method: Shake over ice and double-strain into a chilled cocktail glass.

Garnish: eucalyptus leaf floating

Comments: The story of this drink dates back to 2004 in Uk -Edinburgh while I was working at the Oloroso cocktail bar & restaurant. The owner is the celebrity Scottish chef Tony Singh.  The idea was to make a twist on a well-known, classic cocktail.  I picked the cocktail named the White Lady. I wanted to make a really refreshing and balanced drink, so it came to my mind one day, in Portugal, near my home, we have lots of eucalyptus trees. I knew that when you break the leaf you get a fresh menthol aroma.  I thought why not make a syrup from this young fresh leaf?  I thought that could be a perfect compliment to the gin along with the other citrus.  As it turned out it was. The cocktail become popular and it still is popular today.  After that I created other twists such as the Mojito.  I call it a Koala Mojito.  It uses eucalyptus syrup mixed with mint, lime and rum. Today eucalyptus has inspired many other bartenders and chefs.

I found that in Australia they made vodka flavored with eucalyptus.

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Cocktail Name: La Primavera

La Primavera

6cl Geranium Gin

2cl Lillet Blanc

3cl Korean Aloe Vera honey

3cl Fresh squeezed lime-juice

Method: shake all the ingredients over ice and strain into a lowball glass with fresh ice

Garnish: Grapes

My inspiration

Aloe Vera -also known as the true or medicinal aloe; is a species of succulent plant in the genus Aloe.  This is believed to have originated in the Sudan.  Aloe Vera is frequently cited as being used in medicinal purposes.  Aloe Vera is also commercially available in yogurts, beverages and in some desserts. It can be used as a food substance. Some molecular gastronomists have begun to take advantage of the gelling properties. Perhaps the most notable among these is Chef Quique Dacosta’s “Oysters Guggenheim,” created at El Poblet in Spain.

Like always I look for something unusual ingredient.  I am passionate about herbs, one day I found some aloe Vera plant in a shop and I decided do some research on it.   I found that in Korea they do this amazing aloe Vera honey tea in a jar.  It looks like a green honey jelly and the taste comes crossed a mix of kiwis, grapes and limes.  It’s quite delicious.

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Cocktail Name:  Luisa Julep

Luisa Julep

6cl Bourbon whiskey (Makers Mark)

12-16 lemon verbena leafs

3cl apricot puree

1.5cl sugar syrup

Method: First put in the lemon verbena in a glass (a lot), then the sugar (just a little) muddle without damaging the leaves, add the apricot puree and pack the whole glass with very finely crushed ice — the key to keeping it cold. Then pour in the whiskey, stir, and sip — slowly.

Comments: The plant became popular throughout southern Spain as Yerba Luisa it was connected, even in print, with the more prominent personage Maria Luisa, Queen of Spain.

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Cocktail Name:  Serendipity

Serendipity

6cl Vanilla vodka

2cl Lillet Blanc

3cl Apricot & lemon verbena shrub (apricot puree with sugar blended together with infused lemon verbena, pineapple sage apple cider vinegar)

Top with ginger ale

Garnish:  pineapple sage

Method: Shake over ice all the ingredients and strain into a highball glass

Comments: A great refreshing drink, inspired on the drinks called shrubs from 1800, the way of preserving fruits on vinegar and sugar, here you find a classic pairing flavor between lemon verbena and apricot along with pineapple sage and vanilla a match made in heaven for the summer.

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Cocktail name:  Clover Shrub

Clover Shrub

6cl Tanqueray 10 Gin

2cl Lillet Blanc

3cl Raspberry & Pomegranate Shrub  (Home-made shrub of raspberries, pomegranates, lemon verbena, pineapple sage, chocolate mint infused vinegar)

Dash of Egg white

Method: Shake all the ingredients over ice and double strain into a vintage cocktail glass

Garnish: Pineapple cloverleaf

(The Tanqueray Gin crescent is the pineapple.  This image represents hospitality and assurance of quality, my idea on the garnish is to reflect the same level of hospitality)

Comments: Looking back in time to reinvent a Classic cocktail –

The Clover Club cocktail has roots in the pre-prohibition social club of the same name. It started in the Bellevue-Stratford Hotel in Philadelphia in the late 1880s, the Clover Club was a bawdy group of lawyers, bankers and various other captains of industry who, according to the Old Waldorf-Astoria Bar Book, “…often dined and wined, and wined again.”

A Recipe from 1909 book; “Drinks – How to Mix and Serve”, by Paul E. Lowe, and courtesy of Dave Wondrich who says that the earliest recipe that he discovered had dry vermouth.

This slightly sweet, mostly sour cocktail gained popularity for a time before the First World War, only to fall swiftly and ungraciously out of fashion after the Prohibition era ended. In 1934, Esquire magazine called it a drink for “pansies” and listed it as one of the worst beverages of the previous decade. From then on it was relegated, rather unfairly, to the frilly and sugary “drinks for the ladies” sections of bartending books, until it was recently rediscovered with the revival of the classic cocktail.

Now, I decided to take this classic into another stage  If we look back in time people would preserve fruits in vinegar and sugar.  There was very poor refrigeration at that time.  This method of preservation was named “Shrubs”.

For my shrub I chose an apple cider vinegar and infused it for a week with lemon verbena, pineapple sage and chocolate mint so that the herbs would flavor the vinegar.  Next step was to filter the vinegar from the herbs and mix it with a fresh homemade raspberry & pomegranate fruit puree syrup. The raspberry shrub has a sweet and citrus aftertaste with hints of acidity. This makes a perfect pairing with the fresh citrus notes of the Tanqueray 10 gin. Having enough acidity already in the cocktail, I wouldn’t need to add lemon juice, so to complement the gin and the shrub I only added Lillet Blanc.  Lillet Blanc is a blend of wines with a secret blend of fruit liqueurs, some of which are orange liqueurs. Lillet Blanc is the perfect match between the gin and the shrub. This unique ingredient gives a zest and enhances both flavors.  The final ingredient, to top off the complete cocktail experience, are fresh egg whites.

Egg whites gives the drink the essential froth.  You get an amazing mouth feel and a smooth sensation on the finish.

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Cocktail name: Knickerbocker’s Punch

Knickerbocker's Punch

6cl Angostura 1919 Rum

3cl of raspberry& pomegranate Shrub  (raspberry and pomegranate puree with sugar blended with pineapple sage, lemon verbena, chocolate mint apple cider vinegar)

1.5cl orange Curacao

Top with ginger beer

Method: shake over ice and strain into a highball glass

Garnish: with 3 raspberries and grind Sichuan pepper on top

Comments: A twist-take with more punch in the Knickerbocker cocktail from Jerry Thomas book ” The Bon Vivant’s ” 1862

Bartender Profile: Humberto Marques

I had my first contact with serving drinks when I was 15 years old.  While in college I spent my summer holidays working in a Bar in a beach in Portugal.  The cocktail drinking culture in Portugal wasn’t that much at the time.  My boss had cocktail books in the bar and I spent many an afternoon reading them.  Believe it or not the first cocktail recipe that I made from one of the books it was a Negroni.

Unfortunately I tried it but found it bitter to my young sense of taste.

Please don’t take me wrong, today I do enjoy a Negroni.  The second classic cocktail that I learned was the Golden Cadillac.  My brother was in the hospitality school studying bartending, cooking and waiting tables.

From 1995 to 1997 I continued to work in this bar during the summer holidays.  In 1997 I decided to enter hospitality school and learn about bartending.  In 1998 I found myself working in a 4 star hotel as bartender.

I become bar manager after a half year.

In 2002 I moved to a 5 star hotel as bar supervisor and in 2003 I decided to join a cruise ship line in south of France as bartender.  In the same year I moved to Scotland and started work in the world famous Gleneagles Hotel as bartender.

I stayed for one year.  After this valuable experience I was invited by celebrity Scottish chef Tony Singh to come to work at his cocktail bar & restaurant in Edinburgh.  I stayed four years.  The last two years I was their Bar Manager.

In 2006 I also was a part time Brand Ambassador for Ancon Whisky.  While working for their brand I held several Whisky-tasting events and developed some cocktails.

In 2008 to 2009 I was Brand Ambassador for Global Brands.  I took care of a portfolio of premium spirits in which I played a key role in training sales representation and distribution on all the company brands and spirits in bars, restaurants and shops.  I actively developed new cocktails and drinks for the company.

In 2009 it was back to the bar.  I missed the day to day grind of making drinks and interacting with my customers.

I joined another cocktail bar in Edinburgh as bar supervisor at the famed Hawke & Hunter.

In 2010 I moved to Copenhagen in looking for a new, fresh bar scene and now I found myself working in the best cocktail bar in Copenhagen named 1105 cocktail bar named for the postal code:

www.1105.dk

Education and Qualifications

BTEC: Certificate of Excellence in The Bar (2003) Qualification in Bar Management (2001)

Certificate on Food and Beverage Techniques (1997)

Professional Qualifications

Flow Hospitality certificate training (2010) on- Wine, The Bartender, Licensing, Health & Safety, and Food Hygiene

MCA Award in Basic Sea safety Training – STCW95 – Personal safety and Social responsibilities,

Personal surviving Techniques, Fire prevention and Fire Fighting, Elementary First Aid, ENG 1 Medical Certificate. Certificate accredited by VT Flagship in partnering with Royal Navy Certificate on Leading the Way by the Human resources director of the Chiva- Som Hotel (Thailand) for Hotel do Caramulo****Portugal Certificate on Selling Skills by the Human resources of the Chiva -Som Hotel (Thailand) for Hotel do Caramulo****Portugal  Certificate on Train The Trainer by the Human Resources director of the Chiva-Som Hotel (Thailand) for Hotel do Caramulo****Portugal  Other – Eucalyptus Martini” Cocktail Diploma from Bartender Magazine (American Magazine), Grand Marnier Certificate on – The Grand Marnier Appreciation Course, Morrison Bowmore Distillers Limited Certificate on – The Scotch Whisky Programme, Diploma on Long Drinks National Competition – ABP (Portuguese Bartenders Association)

Award Awards and Achievements

Absolut Invite 2012 Final 10Nordic countries Cocktail competition  - 2th Place

Absolut Invite 2012 Denmark cocktail competition   - 1st Place

Winner of the springtime cocktail competition by About.com with the cocktail” La Primavera” (Gin, Aloe Vera honey, lime juice, Lillet Blanc)

Golden Award received for the Drinks International Cocktail competition 2006

2005 Hendricks Gin cocktail competition winning award in Scotland (Edinburgh)

Dram magazine awards 2005 nominated for the Morgan’s Spiced® Mixologist of the year

2005 Xante® Cocktail Competition Winning award in London

Finalist on the Smirnoff Penka competition in Scotland

Finalist on the Porfidio Cocktail Competition organized by Class Bar Magazine. (Only one entry from Scotland)

Finalist on the competition Grand Marnier® Best Bartender of the Year 2004 in London

Editor’s note:

Expect to see more interviews from working bartenders and mixologists on Wild Table!  Cheers!

http://www.cocktailwhisperer.com

To support our mission and passion for good storytelling, please help support my work and make a tax-deductible donation by clicking here:  Wild River Donation.

Wild River Review/Wild Table editor, Warren Bobrow grew up on a Biodynamic farm in Morristown, NJ. A graduate of Emerson College in Boston- with a degree in Film, he spent his senior year of college as a research assistant in visual thinking. (Center for Advanced Visual Studies @ MIT)

To learn more about Warren, click here:  Wild River Review.

Please follow me on Twitter @WarrenBobrow1

Blue Hill/Stone Barns: Time Exists in Harmony with Nature

WILD TABLE – Billy Reid: Bourbon, Branch and a Splash of Southern Lore

Who owns the rights to work published in Wild River Review?

All work published in the pages of Wild River Review belongs to the magazine.

For print publication, please contact: info@wildriverreview.com

We welcome online links, but you must be fully credited with a link back to the Wild River Review website.

Warren is a cocktail creator/author/contributor to Williams-Sonoma and also for Foodista.

March 21, 2012

Staff of Life

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: , , , , , — warren @ 9:04 am

Editors note:  I first published the writing of Jean Sexton back when Wild Table was just getting established several years ago.

Ever since then, I’ve asked Jean to submit some of her lovely writing- finally, a couple of days ago,  Jean sent me this lovely piece… Without further delay, I bring you- my friend Jean Sexton.  Cheers!  wb

Photo: Warren Bobrow

“Staff Of Life”

cornsbread: often made without milk or eggs and baked or fried (Southern)

While I know they eat cornbread in other parts of the world—even in other parts of the South—they don’t eat my mama’s cornbread.  Hers is surely set apart; scratched into the dry cave walls of Anasazi legend and rained down as manna on the children of Israel wandering lost outside the Promised Land.

A pinch, a scoop, a sprinkle; a splash, a dollop, a dusting; heaped-up or just the least little bit.  About that much, but not much more than that—these are words for measuring cornbread.  No recipe needed; my mother can tell by the way it looks and feels how it will turn out—literally—of the pan:  will it slide or stick or crumble?

My mother prefers her corn meal coarse-ground, which gives more texture and allows the finished product to hold its own against the pressure of a knife smeared with cold butter.  Fine-ground meal equals cakey cornbread and cakey cornbread smacks of eggs and sugar; it is crumbling and delicate and no match for soup beans or stew.

With a practiced motion, my mother draws a black iron skillet (always wiped out, never washed) from the maw of the oven where it’s been heating.  She leaves a potholder draped atop its handle as a “don’t touch!” warning to the household at large.  She edges the pale, grainy-gold batter toward the lip of the mixing bowl-that-used-to-be-green (permit a brief digression:  my mother is still using a set of vintage Pyrex mixing bowls—the ubiquitous yellow, green, red and blue set—that her sister gave their mother in 1950-something, and each one is still known by the name of the color it used to be), controlling its flow into the well-oiled, black iron hoop-sided skillet.  This is the moment of no return:  the bottom layer is instantly welded to its destiny; it must be crust.

The edges bubble a little where a thin halo of molten oil rises atop the batter.  The oven obediently opens its mouth to receive the offering, swallowing whole this inbound iron bound flux of gritty meal, buttermilk and oil.  In 20 minutes, more or less (depending on my father’s covert attempts to eat it half-baked rather than waiting for it to cook), my mother will once again arm herself with a ragged shield of half-melted Dacron loops (potholders earn their keep in her kitchen) and remove this freshly minted gold coin of the Southern realm.  She’ll flip it upside down onto the counter top where it slips from the pan with a steamy sigh of pleasure (which sounds more like a description of “porn-bread,” perhaps, but we are, after all, talking about an object of immense desire).

Four scores across the bottom (it must remain bottom-up to keep the crust from sogging) yield eight wedges of cornbread, with the biggest pieces cut again to preserve an illusion of excess.  Someone—usually my father—dances attendance on the process, hoping to score a bit of crisped crust or a handful of damp crumbs in the fallout.  Still nearly too hot to handle, the wedges are transferred into an elderly plastic basket lined with paper towels.  (I wish I could tell you it was a vintage basket, like the mixing bowls, but it has no such cachet—like my mother’s potholders, the basket is merely old and slightly melted from one-too-many close encounters with hot burners.)

We progress to the table (and I digress to the table, which is actually two tables bolted together in an attempt to provide seating for the original six members of my family, plus three spouses, two second-generation nephews and sundry friends and relatives that sometimes join us).  (The dog doesn’t get a seat, but she’s always there, woven in between our ankles, hoping for her own surreptitious share of cornbread.) We “turn thanks”—a phrase which puzzles those who’ve had the misfortune to be born in places where South is not spoken fluently—it’s a shortened version of the classic admonishment to “return thanks” or ask a blessing for the food we are about to eat, to the nourishment of our bodies to Your service, Amen.  Dig in!

My mother’s cornbread is the patron saint of the table; bestowing a blessing on soups and stews, beans and greens, this and that.  It’s a martyr, drowning beneath black-eyed peas and homemade salsa; a warrior, standing firm under the onslaught of spicy chili; broken and buttered, it’s a peacekeeper, inviting all-comers (whether you prefer your butter straight from the cow or squeezed from some heart-healthy blend of vegetables) to take and eat.

The food is blessed; it’s passed the test. At last my mother sits, at rest.

Meet Jean Sexton

head_Jean2

Asheville native Jean Sexton has been a writer with Biltmore for 10  years, most recently in her role as Editorial Manager for Biltmore and Biltmore Inspirations.

As Editorial Manager, Jean is responsible for blogging and crafting marketing communications for Biltmore Inspirations. In addition, she creates marketing collateral for Inn on Biltmore Estate, Biltmore Estate Wine Company, and is active in corporate and employee communications, Public Relations, and social media marketing, as well.

Prior to her position with Biltmore, Jean worked as the Non-English Speaking Services Coordinator for the Asheville-Mountain Area Chapter of the American Red Cross. She served as the Red Cross representative for seven western counties and was active as an International Services Instructor for the National Red Cross Chapter.

Jean received an undergraduate degree in Cultural Anthropology from UNC-Asheville and a masters degree in Management and Leadership from Montreat College. She is a published author whose work has appeared in a variety of outlets including Wild River Review, Appalachian Heritage, and the NC Journal of Medicine.

To support our mission and passion for good storytelling, please help support my work and make a tax-deductible donation by clicking here:  Wild River Donation.

Wild River Review/Wild Table editor, Warren Bobrow grew up on a Biodynamic farm in Morristown, NJ. A graduate of Emerson College in Boston- with a degree in Film, he spent his senior year of college as a research assistant in visual thinking. (Center for Advanced Visual Studies @ MIT)

To learn more about Warren, click here:  Wild River Review.

Please follow me on Twitter @WarrenBobrow1

Blue Hill/Stone Barns: Time Exists in Harmony with Nature

WILD TABLE – Billy Reid: Bourbon, Branch and a Splash of Southern Lore

Who owns the rights to work published in Wild River Review?

All work published in the pages of Wild River Review belongs to the magazine.

For print publication, please contact: info@wildriverreview.com

We welcome online links, but you must be fully credited with a link back to the Wild River Review website.

Warren is a cocktail creator/author/contributor to Williams-Sonoma and also for Foodista.

January 25, 2012

Andrew Bell- American Sommelier-The Five Questions- by: Warren Bobrow, Editor-Wild Table

Andrew Bell-Photo: American Sommelier

By the kind efforts of Melissa Braverman, Wild River Review’s- Wild Table column has been able to secure the Five Questions from Andrew Bell, the Co-Founder and President of American Sommelier.

Recognized as one of the top wine educators in the country, Andrew has nearly 25 years of industry experience that also includes winemaking in France, working alongside Michelin three-starred restaurant Guy Savoy as second sommelier and founding American Sommelier. Known for his accessible, “never order a bad bottle again” approach to understanding wine, he has been quoted in such outlets as Reuters, Wine Enthusiast and Bloomberg and leads American Sommelier’s 26-week Viticulture & Vinification course.  Popular with wine enthusiasts and industry professionals alike, the course covers wine from A to Z (food pairings, varieties, geography, winemaking, etc.) and has sparked the creation of a six-day immersion version.

Editor’s Note: I am a fan of wine that speaks of the place- of the soil or rock if you will.  Biodynamic, organic?  A big plus in my book.  That’s not to say that I only drink organic or Biodynamic, far from.

My focus is on passionate winemaking.  I believe that these wines do not have to be expensive to be delicious!  Please take for example my local store- 56 Degree Wines in Bernardsville, NJ.  Chris Cree, the owner is a Master of Wine, one of 29 in the United States.  He is, to my knowledge one of the only MW’s with his own shop!  They sell wines and other spirits- made by passionate individuals!

Does your store do this for you?  If not, point your browser to his page- I think you’ll be quite pleased with what you see and taste!

Without further delay, may I present- Andrew Bell, American Sommelier and the Five Questions.  Cheers! wb

Andrew Bell-Photo: American Sommelier

WRR:  1. Why wine?  What led you to the wine world?  Did you travel as a boy to Europe?  I know you lived in France, where else have your travels taken you?

I  grew up around wine, but not in any way that might lead me to this industry.  I only first visited Europe when I was 24.  After four and a half years of living in France, I moved back to New York to start my import and distribution company.  I founded the New York chapter of American Sommelier in 1999 and took over as the organization’s U.S. president three years later.

Over the years, since returning to the U.S. from France, my travels have taken me to Chile, Bulgaria, Italy, France, Germany, Spain, Portugal, Greece and now South Africa.

Andrew Bell in the Cellar-Photo: American Sommelier

WRR:  2.  Do you cook?  If so, who taught you?

I spent 15 years working in the restaurant business, and I made friends almost as much with the kitchen staff as I did with the front of the house team.  I paid attention to how they prepared everything.  So from the kitchen of Splendidos in San Francisco all the way to Guy Savoy’s two-starred restaurant in Paris, I learned from the best — and have tried to recreate many recipes from these amazingly talented people (albeit, in some case, with very limited success!).

WRR:  3. What is in your freezer right now?

Well, I have 3 children so…chicken nuggets, soy milk ice cream sandwiches and ice.  And a pork roast for the grown-up paletes in our household!

Andrew Bell- Photo: American Sommelier

WRR:  4.  Is there any wine that brings a tear to your eye when you taste it?  Why? What led you to found American Sommelier and what is the biggest misconception people have about wine education?

I think any well made wine can make you teary because the level of emotion comes from who you’re with and why you’re enjoying a bottle and not necessarily what’s in the bottle.  My big a-ha moment was with a 1988 Woodward Canyon Cabernet Sauvignon. It had elements of bitter cocoa powder, dark cassis and light plums.  In a word, wow!  It was a great moment of discovery.

Anything is possible when a wine is well made, and you are open to experiencing it.  That moment happened 20 years ago and opened up a new world for me.  I had studied psychology in school and originally wanted to be a therapist and teach at a university, but wine became the subject — and American Sommelier my universe.  American Sommelier was born out of the Sommelier Society of America in 1998, and I helped found it with the goal of increasing wine awareness through education – of helping people have their own a-ha moments with wine.

Andrew Bell-Outside-Photo: American Sommelier

WRR:  5.  Is there any place in the world that you would love to be right now? Why?

Where I am right now!  I’m visiting South African vineyards, meeting incredible people with a dream for themselves and their country.  It is quite humbling when you see and hear the story of a country weighed down by its own past yet always looking forward the future.  The stories I hear will become part of my story which I share whenever I teach or speak to people interested in the wine and food business.  The people I am meeting here are without pretense and a wonderful example of how the enjoyment of wine is a truly universal experience.

Thank you Andrew!

AMERICAN SOMMELIER AND CHARLIE PALMER GROUP

PARTNER TO HOST WINE SEMINARS

Program to Kick Off at Renowned New York City Restaurant Aureole on February 6, 2012

NEW YORK, NY (January 19, 2012) – American Sommelier, the nation’s preeminent wine education organization, and the Charlie Palmer Group, Master Chef and Hospitality Entrepreneur Charlie Palmer’s collection of award-winning restaurants and hotels, announce a partnership to host a monthly series of experiential wine events. The 12-session series is scheduled to take place one Monday of each month at Palmer’s flagship location Aureole in New York City from February 6 to December 17, 2012. Each two-hour seminar is designed to help participants make informed and intelligent wine choices while exploring unique topics including Lock, Stock & Barrel; Unusual Grapes and Why We Love Them; and History in the Tasting .

Each session is lead by American Sommelier President and CEO Andrew Bell. Bell is recognized as one of the foremost wine educators in the country. Over the past 25 years, he has worked in all sectors of the wine industry while honing his passion for teaching.

“We are delighted to be working with the Charlie Palmer Group on this innovative series,” said Andrew Bell. “These seminars are designed to help both beginner and more advanced wine lovers explore different grape varieties, styles and regions while gaining the confidence to make educated wine selections on their own. Covering a wide range of material, we have planned a curriculum that is both informative and entertaining—these seminars are going to be a really enjoyable way to spend a Monday night.”

Aureole Beverage Director Justin Lorenz will also be on hand to lend his expertise. Responsible for developing Aureole’s robust list of more than 1,500 wine selections from around the world, Lorenz has studied with American Sommelier and brings more than a decade of wine knowledge to his role at the restaurant.

“Aureole’s wine program complements the menu’s progressive American cuisine. Nearly 15,000 bottles of wine are stored on premise and diners can experience an extensive collection with great depth in Italy, Spain, Austria, Germany and the Rhône Valley,” added Lorenz. “With their dedication to raising the overall level of wine knowledge and awareness, American Sommelier is the ideal partner to assist our customers in their search for the perfect bottle.”

During each seminar, attendees will taste 10 wines carefully selected to illustrate the evening’s theme, paired with light hors doeuvres from Aureole’s Executive Chef Marcus Ware. On May 10, a limited-seating Spring Pairing Dinner will feature a specially prepared seasonal menu and wines artfully paired with each of the four courses.

The monthly seminars will take place Monday evenings between 6:30 PM and 8:30 PM in Aureole’s private dining room, beginning February 6 with Sparkle & Shine featuring sparkling wines from around the world. The price for enrollment is $150 per event. Individuals wishing to attend any five events will receive a 5% discount, while those signing up for all 12 receive a

10% discount (not including the pairing dinner). The Spring Pairing Dinner is offered for $275 per guest.

For more information, please visit http://www.americansommelier.com/education/seminars/. To sign up, please contact Rachel Koblic, Director of Operations of American Sommelier, at 212.897.4129 or RachelKoblic@AmericanSommelier.com.

About American Sommelier

American Sommelier is revolutionizing the way the world thinks about wine. Committed to empowering both the consumer and professional to make informed and intelligent choices, the organization serves as a forum where all wine lovers may gather to speak as equals. American Sommelier offers a comprehensive curriculum of wine education and provides a wide range of additional benefits to its members. The organization hosts seminars, tastings, and networking opportunities to enhance knowledge and skills and to promote a vibrant wine community. Since 1998, American Sommelier has hosted the biennial “Best Sommelier in America” competition that recognizes excellence in the wine service industry. The organization creates custom experiential and advisory services for individuals, groups, and corporations both in and out of the hospitality industry. From cellar consultation and wine list development to job placement and insider wine journeys, American Sommelier’s mission remains the same: to cultivate awareness, understanding, and appreciation for wine.

About Aureole:

Renowned Chef Charlie Palmer’s unabashed, energetic signature Progressive American cuisine first took root in the original townhouse location of Aureole, where the chef made an early commitment to farm over factory food. Today, Michelin-starred Aureole shines at the spectacular Bank of America Tower at One Bryant Park, the most environmentally advanced skyscraper in the world. Overseen by wine director Justin Lorenz, Aureole’s wine program complements the menu’s progressive American cuisine. Wine lovers have always found an extensive collection of Burgundy, Bordeaux, and California Cabernet. But Aureole also offers more than 1,700 selections with over 15,000 bottles stored on premise from around the world with great depth in Italy, Spain, Austria, Germany, and the Rhône Valley, and two dozen by-the-glass pairings, matched to our seasonal tasting menus. www.CharliePalmer.com; 212-319-1660.

Thanks should also go to Melissa Braverman who has treated me so very kindly during our conversations via email.

Her contact information is just below.

Thank you Melissa for your editing skills and kindness! wb

Melissa Braverman
Senior Media Specialist
evins communications, ltd. 635 madison avenue new york, ny 10022
phone:

ph: 212.688.8200  fax:  212.935.6730 www.evins.com

To support our mission and passion for good storytelling, please help support my work and make a tax-deductible donation by clicking here:  Wild River Donation.

Wild River Review/Wild Table editor, Warren Bobrow grew up on a Biodynamic farm in Morristown, NJ. A graduate of Emerson College in Boston- with a degree in Film, he spent his senior year of college as a research assistant in visual thinking. (Center for Advanced Visual Studies @ MIT)

To learn more about Warren, click here:  Wild River Review.

Please follow me on Twitter @WarrenBobrow1

Blue Hill/Stone Barns: Time Exists in Harmony with Nature

WILD TABLE – Billy Reid: Bourbon, Branch and a Splash of Southern Lore

Who owns the rights to work published in Wild River Review?

All work published in the pages of Wild River Review belongs to the magazine.

For print publication, please contact: info@wildriverreview.com

We welcome online links, but you must be fully credited with a link back to the Wild River Review website.

Warren is a cocktail creator/author/contributor to Williams-Sonoma and also for Foodista.

January 18, 2012

Lincoln Henderson, (Master Distiller) The Five Questions

My friend Katie DeVito sent me an email the other day.  She’s in the public relations business here in NJ and Lincoln Henderson’s name with his new product Angel’s Envy crossed her desk.  Since she knows my desire to cover issues regarding the spirits industry- it was my great pleasure to receive an email from her introducing me to the new brand.  Thanks Katie!  (I’ve included her contact information at the bottom)

I’m passionate about the liquor known as Bourbon Whiskey.  I think it’s in my blood. It wasn’t until after my grandfather passed away that I realized that I had Bourbon deeply entrenched in my soul.  But how?

How does Bourbon become a part of a person- even before they enjoy a sip?  Is it in my genes?

My grandfather had a liquid collection of Old Forester, Old Grand Dad, Jim Beam and Ancient Age Bourbon.  Some of these mid-century modern styled bottles date back to the late 1940’s and others to the late 1950’s.

This priceless collection, (albeit a bit less in the bottle now) still graces my bar and occasionally my glass. (Without ice or water,  I might add.)

I used to say that these spirits were made by men- long gone.  That was until I became more knowledgeable about Bourbon and the men who craft this truly American spirit.  Maybe there is something in the spirit itself that contributes to long life.

I’m not sure about the fountain of youth in a bottle, but my grandmother turns 100 on February 14th this year.  She still takes a nip of the brown spirit at bed-time.  Perhaps Bourbon is the key to her longevity?

It just might be true about drinking Bourbon and old age.  As I said, I have Bourbon in my blood!

Tasting notes:  Angel’s Envy

Soft in the mouth- not rough in any way.  This is part of the new style of Bourbon.  The older style was rougher- rough and tumble- speaking of fire and burn.  This “Expression” as Mr. Henderson describes his brand,  is elegant and pure.  The barrels were sourced in Portugal, used Port Casks – again, this Expression is a signature mark on the palate.  Port casks give a unique and subtle sweetness to the finish- a long one at that!

Flavors of vanilla, charred Hoe Cakes (made from toasted corn) and caramelized fruits reveal themselves along with the brooding heat- but not too much heat!  I did the tasting in a highly unscientific fashion- under less than ideal conditions.  I just opened the 200ml bottle, poured myself a little tasting glass, inhaled and sipped.  That was it!  Yes!  I like it.

Lincoln Henderson

Without further delay- may I present, Lincoln Henderson- Master Distiller.

1. WRRWhere are you from?  When did you realize you had a passion for Brown liquor?
a.     Born at Ft. Sill, OK.  While on a college Christmas break in OK we took a trip to Texas (OK was dry) to buy spirits and came back with a case of Ancient Age Bourbon.  Was hooked thereafter.

2. WRR: Do you cook?  If so, is there anything you prepare that has a history to it?  Who taught you about food? Mother? Father? Grandparents?
a.    Cooked a great deal in past years.  Loved to make ravioli from scratch.  Also croissants (which took 2 days to make).  Now the only thing I manage to cook is corn, rye and barley.  However my mother taught us 3 boys to fend for ourselves including cooking.

Lincoln Standing

3. WRR: What is in your refrigerator right now? Any cocktail ingredients you’d like to tell us about?
a.    Leftovers.  Cocktail ingredients are ice and water.  Although the young creative bartenders and mixologists are starting to change my feelings on how bourbon can be used.

4. WRR:  If you could be anywhere in the world right now, where would that be?  When you sourced your barrels from Portugal, did you hand select them?

a.    Kentucky.

We did hand source the ex-Port barrels.  One cannot take chances on where your barrels come from and what was in the barrel.

(Editor’s note: Angel’s Envy Bourbon uses hand-selected wood barrels from Portugal that formerly held Port Wine)

5. WRR:   Is there anything that you drink or eat that brings a tear to your eye when you (eat/drink) it?  Why?

a.    Coffee is definitely my first choice of drink after bourbon and mussels and more mussels are my first love in foods.

Lincoln- his son Wes and grandson Kyle

Master Distiller – Lincoln Henderson
Described by Wine and Spirits magazine as a “Living Legend” in the distilled spirits industry, Mr. Henderson is one of the world’s leading spirits experts, and an inaugural member of the Kentucky Bourbon Hall of Fame.  As the master distiller of Brown-Forman Corporation for 40 years, he developed or assisted with the development and supervision of products such as: Woodford Reserve, Jack Daniel’s “Gentleman Jack,” Jack Daniel’s Country Cocktails, Jack Daniel’s Single Barrel, Don Eduardo Tequila, Old Forester, in addition to several other brands.  He was also directly responsible for the quality of all new and maturing whiskeys, in addition to technical distillery supervision, sensory evaluation, and exploratory product development.  Other honors include the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Malt Advocate, and a judge position for the International Wine and Spirit Competition in the UK.  Lincoln is a graduate of the University of Louisville with a bachelor’s degree in biology and holds a master’s degree from Webster University.  A resident of Lexington Kentucky, he is married with two children and ten grandchildren.

LIVING LEGEND SET TO LAUNCH
ANGEL’S ENVY IN NEW JERSEY

Garden State Among the First Markets to Experience
World’s Premier Super-Premium Bourbon

Louisville, Kentucky (January, 2012) – Louisville Distilling Company announced that it has chosen New Jersey among the first launch markets for Angel’s Envy, a super-premium bourbon of uncompromising character and quality.

The highly anticipated small batch artisan bourbon is the culmination of Master Distiller Lincoln Henderson’s storied career.  One of the original pioneers of the premium bourbon and whiskey categories in the U.S., Lincoln came out of retirement to create the world’s finest bourbon on his own terms – with a simple desire to enjoy the art of making whiskey.  The Master Distiller, which many have called a living legend, brings with him more than 40 years of experience, having worked on world-class brands, such as Woodford Reserve and Jack Daniels.

The Louisville Distilling Company gave Lincoln complete creative freedom to create his bourbon, his own way.  He chose to return to the original way of producing whiskey – making decisions based on the specific taste profile he wants to achieve.  He will use locally sourced, non-GMO grains, Kentucky limestone water and hand-chosen port barrels shipped directly from Portugal.

Each batch—or Expression, as Lincoln calls it—will be guided by his hand and allowed to develop naturally, creating nuances in the bourbon from year to year.  This year’s release is Expression 10/10, which possesses a warm spirit, lacking any hint of edginess with ephemeral hints of port wine and a rich amber hue.

The Expression is distilled for an unparalleled smoothness, aged for 4-6 years in new charred white oak barrels and finished in port barrels for an incremental 5-7 months.  The final result is exceptionally smooth, nuanced and refined bourbon.

“Angel’s Envy is a lot of things,” says Lincoln Henderson, Master Distiller, Angel’s Envy.  “It’s my life’s work.  It’s a whiskey of incomparable smoothness.  It takes into account over 200 years of bourbon heritage and mingles it with over 400 years of port wine heritage.  And it’s something I’m going to let develop each year so every batch will be a natural expression of the distiller’s craft.”

The bottle will be as iconic as the bourbon inside.  Made from perfume-grade glass in Italy and ceramic stamped with our iconic wings, the bottle is hand-filled, corked and crated in Louisville, Kentucky.

As far as the name, it’s well accepted in bourbon circles that each distillery owes a percentage of the bourbon in their barrels to the angels – known as the Angel’s Share.  But, Lincoln sat the angels down and got them to agree that they could take a larger share if they agreed to leave behind something even better.  The result is Angel’s Envy.

In addition to New Jersey, Angel’s Envy will be available in the following markets: Louisville, New York, Miami/Ft. Lauderdale, Chicago, San Francisco, Austin, Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, Houston, Dallas, Nashville, Portland, Washington, DC, and Boulder/Denver.

The suggested retail price for a 750ml bottle, which may vary by market, is $44.99.  Angel’s Envy is 86.6 proof and 43.3% alcohol by volume.  Please visit us at www.angelsenvy.com or on Facebook.

To support our mission and passion for good storytelling, please help support my work and make a tax-deductible donation by clicking here:  Wild River Donation.

Wild River Review/Wild Table editor, Warren Bobrow grew up on a Biodynamic farm in Morristown, NJ. A graduate of Emerson College in Boston- with a degree in Film, he spent his senior year of college as a research assistant in visual thinking. (Center for Advanced Visual Studies @ MIT)

To learn more about Warren, click here:  Wild River Review.

Please follow me on Twitter @WarrenBobrow1

Blue Hill/Stone Barns: Time Exists in Harmony with Nature

WILD TABLE – Billy Reid: Bourbon, Branch and a Splash of Southern Lore

Who owns the rights to work published in Wild River Review?

All work published in the pages of Wild River Review belongs to the magazine.

For print publication, please contact: info@wildriverreview.com

We welcome online links, but you must be fully credited with a link back to the Wild River Review website.

Warren is a cocktail creator/author/contributor to Williams-Sonoma and also for Foodista.

http://www.cocktailwhisperer.com

Two historic bottles from my collection

Contact information from Katie DeVito

Owner, Katie DeVito, LLC
www.katiedevito.com
Founder, NJ Unemployed
www.njunemployed.com

January 9, 2012

The Five Questions-Natalie West, Foppiano Wines

One of my first wine drinking memories- of California wine that is- surrounds a bottle of Foppiano.  I remember being in private school- at Morristown-Beard in New Jersey.  There were many kids like myself- their parents had incredible wine cellars and we were all encouraged to taste wine with dinner or by itself.

This was the 1970’s, things were a bit freer then.

I was raised around fine wine and artisan food, for those who don’t know me, I grew up on a gentleman’s farm that belonged to my grandparents and partially my parents.  Today, this farm is certified Organic and Biodynamic.

At that time in the 1960’s and 70’s most European food that we came across on our journey was artisan in nature.  Travel for Americans was always popular, sure-  yet regional cuisine flourished unhindered until the explosion of fast food and faster tastes that came with Americans visiting Europe.

I traveled through most of Europe, the Ivory Coast of Africa and some of Brazil with my parents in the 60’s and 70’s.  I was never was denied the fruit of the grape, nor beer, nor the local spirits.  Was this good? Bad?  Who knows.  Sure makes for a good story.

As memory serves me the first California wine that I remember drinking with my friends, at a party was a Foppiano Petite Sirah.   This wine, in my palate’s memory will always be with me.  It was just different than the French wines that graced our dinner table.

The Foppiano wine was explosive in the glass and it woke up my young sensibilities.  The only wines I knew at this point were from Europe- and they were pretty good in my memory…

With all the brands of interesting wines available to my young palate- most were French, so when I tasted something so unfamiliar to me- I had to take notice!

Fast forward to present day.

I go back to California for wine on Twitter.  Some of my friends are in the wine biz.  Still others would like to read more of my “serious” wine writing.

I used to only write about travel, then food, then wine… Now, cocktails but who knows? One thing is for certain- I love the wines of Foppiano.  They taste authentic.  Not manipulated or forced.  There is passion in the depth of the flavors in the offerings.

Is there a difference in style between their wines?  I leave that for you to decide.  I know enough about wine not to assign a score (other than my personal opinion)  to anything.  Your palate should be your guide, not someone who is not you!

Natalie West

Until then, may I present Natalie West, Foppiano Wines.

WRR: 1. Where are you from? Who taught you to cook? Mother? Father? Grandparents? What are your earliest memories of food?

I am from Healdsburg, I have been here since I was four years old.

My mother taught me to cook.

My earliest memory of food goes back to when I was a kid. For as long as I can remember we were always very active with the grape harvest, we’d pick the grapes and would bring them to the winery. After a long hard day in the field, night  fall would come and we’d have a massive feast that had been prepared lovingly by my mom and aunts. Of course it was my dad who was in charge of barbecuing the chicken and steak. But what I remember most are the desserts, the most I’ve seen in my life. And, my favorite was the blueberry cheese cake that my mom would make. I am a total sugar person!

Natalie celebrating harvest

WRR: 2. What do you have in your freezer right now? Any cocktail ingredients in your fridge? Do you cure your own cherries?

What a great question. In my freezer right now I have frozen strawberries, tomato sauce, frozen green beans picked from my garden, Ben & Jerry’s Willie Nelson’s Country Peach Cobbler and Häagen-Dazs Vanilla ice cream. Plus I always keep puff pastry around for an apple or a cherry tart or for something savory like a goat cheese, thyme and caramelized onion tart.

As for cocktail ingredients, I have a fairly well-stocked bar including Bombay Sapphire Gin, Bulleit Bourbon, a few brandies from Germain-Robain from the Redwood Valley, vermouth, dark rum and tequila—with which I am just getting reacquainted. I always keep on hand simple syrup, citrus, bitters, and olives. I store the alcohol in decanters because it looks pretty. Like serving wine in the proper glass, I am a big believer in doing the same with cocktails. For instance I have collection of mint julep cups that I absolutely adore.  I can’t imagine drinking one in anything else.

No, I do not cure my own cherries but I always have a stash of Amarena Italian wild cherries, which are absolutely perfect in an old fashioned or a Manhattan.

WRR: 3. Is there anything that you prepare (or eat) that brings a tear to your eye when you eat (or smell) it? Why? Who does this remind you of?

Aside from onions, Cioppino brings a tear to my eye, my mother makes it every year for my birthday.

Natalie in Cellar

WRR: 4. If you could be anywhere in the world at this very moment, where would that be and why?

Italy because of the great food, wine and beautiful landscape. It’s reminiscent of home but also different. And the people are so friendly. It is just a good all-around lovely place to be.

WRR: 5. Social media brought us together… (thank you!!!!) Do you use a Smart Phone? Twitter? (will need link) Facebook? (will need link) LinkedIN? Anything you want to say about the Real Time Internet and how it’s helped your career?

I have an iPhone, I do not Tweet and I am on Facebook and Linked-In. What I love about social media is the fact that you can reach more people, more palates, and get more opinions. I think it has really helped the wine industry. I know for me, I have gotten to know more colleagues throughout Napa and Sonoma and beyond.

WRR: 5.5. Tell us a little bit about your role at Foppiano

A lot of the reason I came to Foppiano is because I have total freedom to do what I think is best—no set recipe. I have been encouraged to continue to add to the wine program and try fun things like port, rose, and smaller bottles of petite sirah. I try to let the wine speak for itself, respect the fruit, and not intervene too much—I think this makes the best wine. During my tenure here, I have gotten close to my colleagues who really take pride in their work.

We have a good time.

Some days after work, we sit down and share a bottle of J Sparkling wine together.

Thank you Natalie for participating in the Five Questions!  wb

To support our mission and passion for good storytelling, please help support my work and make a tax-deductible donation by clicking here:  Wild River Donation.

Wild River Review/Wild Table editor, Warren Bobrow grew up on a Biodynamic farm in Morristown, NJ. A graduate of Emerson College in Boston- with a degree in Film, he spent his senior year of college as a research assistant in visual thinking. (Center for Advanced Visual Studies @ MIT)

To learn more about Warren, click here:  Wild River Review.

Please follow me on Twitter @WarrenBobrow1

Blue Hill/Stone Barns: Time Exists in Harmony with Nature

WILD TABLE – Billy Reid: Bourbon, Branch and a Splash of Southern Lore

Who owns the rights to work published in Wild River Review?

All work published in the pages of Wild River Review belongs to the magazine.

For print publication, please contact: info@wildriverreview.com

We welcome online links, but you must be fully credited with a link back to the Wild River Review website.

Warren is a cocktail blogger for Williams-Sonoma and also for Foodista.

http://www.cocktailwhisperer.com

Warren Bobrow’s interview with Food Business International 12/2011

Today’s fun!! click!

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